Age, Biography and Wiki

Abigail Satinsky (Abigail Bette Satinsky) was born on 1981 in American. Discover Abigail Satinsky's Biography, Age, Height, Physical Stats, Dating/Affairs, Family and career updates. Learn How rich is She in this year and how She spends money? Also learn how She earned most of networth at the age of 39 years old?

Popular As Abigail Bette Satinsky
Occupation N/A
Age 39 years old
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Born
Birthday
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Nationality American

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Abigail Satinsky Height, Weight & Measurements

At 39 years old, Abigail Satinsky height not available right now. We will update Abigail Satinsky's Height, weight, Body Measurements, Eye Color, Hair Color, Shoe & Dress size soon as possible.

Physical Status
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Dating & Relationship status

She is currently single. She is not dating anyone. We don't have much information about She's past relationship and any previous engaged. According to our Database, She has no children.

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Abigail Satinsky Net Worth

She net worth has been growing significantly in 2018-19. So, how much is Abigail Satinsky worth at the age of 39 years old? Abigail Satinsky’s income source is mostly from being a successful . She is from American. We have estimated Abigail Satinsky's net worth, money, salary, income, and assets.

Net Worth in 2020 $1 Million - $5 Million
Salary in 2019 Under Review
Net Worth in 2019 Pending
Salary in 2019 Under Review
House Not Available
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Timeline

2019

As a curator and programmer, her interest has been in championing interdisciplinary, process-based, and under-recognized artists’ work, artist-run and collaboratively organized community projects, and highlighting how artists have worked within and in solidarity with social movements. She is a founding member of InCUBATE, a research collaborative on art economies, and co-initiator of Sunday Soup, an international micro-granting project. Satinsky co-founded and acted as co-director (along with Bryce Dwyer, Matthew Joynt and Roman Petruniak) of inCUBATE, a research group that curated, initiated and co-produced artist projects out of a Chicago store front from 2007 to 2009. InCUBATE became known for its Sunday Soup series, a micro-granting program which hosted dinner parties and used the proceeds to fund community-based artist projects voted on by the dinner guests. InCUBATE’s work has been shown nationally, including Creative Time, Eyebeam Center for Art and Technology in New York, CEPA Gallery in Buffalo, SKYDIVE in Houston, Autzen Gallery at Portland State University, the Devos Museum at Northern Michigan University and the Smart Museum of Art in Chicago.

2016

In 2016, she received the Art Journal Award for distinguished writing from College Art Association for her essay "Movement Building for Beginners".

2014

Satinsky has worked with artists on solo exhibitions and projects while associate director at Threewalls, including Brandon Alvendia, Irina Botea (nominated for best time-based format by the International Association for Art Critics in 2014), Harold Mendez, Seth Kim-Cohen, Jaime Davidovich (with Daniel Quiles), Latham Zearfoss, ACRE TV, Rozalinda Borcila, Brian Holmes, Ashley Hunt, taisha paggett, Faith Wilding, and Mary Patten. She organized more than 100 programs over her time there which included artists and scholars Fred Moten, e-flux library, Laurie Palmer, Lane Relyea, Mary Jane Jacob, Daniel Joseph Martinez, and Michael Brenson. She also co-organized MDW Fair, an independent art fair showcasing Midwest artists and space.

In 2014 Satinsky edited the book, Support Networks, part of the Chicago Social Practice History series (edited by Mary Jane Jacob and Kate Zeller in the Department of Exhibitions and Exhibition Studies at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago). She has published essays and articles on online platforms such as Art Practical and Temporary Art Review, and for organizations such as Open Engagement. She is a regular contributor to the Bad at Sports podcast and her writing has appeared in the Journal of Aesthetics and Protest, AREA Chicago, and Proximity Magazine. She contributed to podcast conversations with Bad at Sports which were collected in two edited volumes, Say It While You Still Mean It: Conversations on Art and Practice, Volumes 1 and 2, published by Open Engagement in Print. She was editor of the book Support Networks, published by the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and University of Chicago Press, which chronicles socially engaged art in Chicago over the last one hundred years.

2010

From 2010 to 2015, she worked at Threewalls as associate director, where she edited two editions of Phonebook, in 2011 and 2015 (a national directory of artist-run spaces and projects). During this time she co-founded the Hand-in-Glove conference with Shannon R. Stratton, Bryce Dwyer and Elizabeth Chodos, and was one of the co-founders of Common Field, national initiatives on advocacy for small to mid-size nonprofits and grassroots artist projects, and Community Supported Art, a program to sell affordable artist editions modeled after Community Supported Agriculture.

1981

Abigail Satinsky (born 1981) is an American arts organizer, curator and writer on socially engaged art.

Abigail Satinsky (born 1981), daughter of Daniel Satinsky and Dinah Vaprin, earned a Bachelor of Fine Art in 2003 from Carnegie Mellon University and a Master of Arts, dual degree in Modern Art History and Arts Administration and Policy in 2009 from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Her thesis, submitted to the Department of Art History, Theory and Criticism, and Department of Art Administration and Policy, was on the collaborative work of Group Material (from 1976 to 1996). Her partner is Anthony Romero.